Blogs

WELCOME Sonya: Volunteer joins district staff as Miller Woods Property Manager

Sonya is no stranger to the district as she has been a dedicated volunteer at Miller Woods since 2006. Recognized at the District’s 2014 Annual Dinner for her service, Sonya has contributed over 5000 volunteer hours.

Born and raised near Orlando, Florida Sonya has made Oregon her home since 2003.  She loves the mild weather, being surrounded by trees and seeing mountains in the distance.  An avid outdoor adventurer she enjoys running, cycling, hiking, cooking and reading.

She holds a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Florida. Her career includes working with runaway and homeless teens in California and later working in finance and office administration at OHSU in Portland.  

After her many years of dedicated service, she feels right at home as the Miller Woods Property Manager. Sonya can be reached by emailingyswcd.millerwoods@gmail.com or calling the district office at 503-472-6403.

All-Seasons Approach to Monitoring and Managing Spotted Wing Drosophila Webinar

Tuesday, April 12, 2016   •  10 – 11:30 am Pacific time  •  FREE 

Registration required at www.pesticide.org/swd_webinar_2016 or contact Sharon Selvaggio at 503-704-0327 sselvaggio@pesticide.org

Soft fruit growers: Attend to add monitoring, prevention, and cultural methods to your management plan!

The webinar will be organized by each of the four seasons, demonstrating what’s happening in the life cycle of SWD, and effective techniques to monitor and reduce populations.

Dr. Amy Dreves (Oregon State University, Assistant Professor & Sr. Researcher, IPM Research, Extension and Education Entomologist) will be presenting.

A Spanish translation of the webinar will be available online by early summer.

Thank You Jackson Family Wines for Volunteering at Miller Woods

The district would like to express a big THANK YOU to Ken Kupperman, Director of Vineyard Operations for Jackson Family Wines, for offering to send his crew to work in our Native Plant Nursery at Miller Woods. The timing was perfect as the district needed help planting their bare root plants into pots for the “grow out” process. Jackson Family Wines owns and operates the Gran Moraine Winery and volunteerism is an integral part of their company mission. And after having the group volunteer for two full days for us, we have to agree with Ken’s assessment. He told us his crew did not consist of good workers, it consists of GREAT workers! That was evident by how much they got done in two days and their dedication to serve their community. Thank you again to everyone who volunteered. You can visit their website at http://www.granmoraine.com.  

 

TWO POPULAR AUTHORS WILL SIGN BOOKS AT THE NATIVE PLANT SALE

Eileen Stark, author of Real Gardens Grow Natives, will be joining us again on Thursday, February 4 from 10:30 am to Noon, to answer questions and sign copies of her book. Eileen is a landscape designer and consultant who specializes in developing wildlife habitat gardens.  Visit Eileen’s webpage at www.realgardensgrownatives.com to learn more about Eileen and gardening with native plants.

 

 

Kristin Ohlson from Portland, will be signing her new book The Soil Will Save Us on Saturday, February 6 from Noon - 2:00 pm Kristin was a 2015 finalist for the Oregon Book Awards and was the winner of the 2015 Books for a Better Life (Green Category).  Her book focuses on how scientists, farmers, and foodies are healing the soil to save the planet.  For more information about Kristin go to www.kristinohlson.com

Winter Farming Series offered by the OSU Extension Service Small Farms Program

Are you interested in exploring whether winter production would be a good addition to your farm business? There are several crops that can be harvested during the winter months in Oregon. This class series will cover the basics of winter production including season extension tips and tools, planting dates and varietal selection that you will need to get started in winter production. We’ll also walk you through the process of keeping records to track production costs and analyzing whether winter production can be a profitable enterprise for your farm.

You’ll have a chance to visit with farmers that are experienced with winter production to get perspectives from the field. Our goal is to support you with testing out winter production on your farm to determine whether it is a feasible enterprise for your operation. Classes are spread out over a whole year and timed so that you can apply what you learn for your winter plantings in 2016.

Class Schedule

  • Winter Farming Tour - January 20, 2016 from 9 - 4 pm
  • Winter Crop Planning and Marketing - February 10, 2016 from 6 - 8:30 pm
  • Winter Vegetable Field Day and Season Extension Structures - March 9, 2016 from 1 - 5:30 pm
  • Recordkeeping for Profitability Analysis - July 6, 2016 from 6 - 8:30 pm
  • Winter Farm Enterprise Profitability Analysis - January 25, 2017 from 6-8:30 pm

Registration fee is $120 for 5 sessions.

To view a detailed agenda or to register visit our website http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/southern-willamette-valley-program/winter-farming

Classes will meet at the Polk County Extension Office (289 E Ellendale Ave Suite 301, Dallas, OR 97338) or at the North Willamette Research and Extension Center (15210 NE Miley Road Aurora, OR 97002)

Contact Amy Garrett to determine if this class is right for you or call 541-766-3556.

Water Rights Open House

You are invited to join the Polk Soil and Water Conservation District, Oregon Water Resources Department and the Natural Resource Conservation Service to discuss water quantity issues and irrigation efficiency opportunities.  Water Master, Joel Plahn, will be present to answer questions.

Where: OSU Extension Office, 289 E. Ellendale, Ste 301 Dallas, OR

When: 3-5 pm, Thursday January 7th

Please RSVP by January 4th to Polk SWCD at marc.bell@polkswcd.com or call 503-623-9680 ext 103

Welcome Thomas Hoskins to NRCS Staff

Thomas Hoskins has joined the Yamhill County NRCS staff as the new District Conservationist for Yamhill County. His most recent position was in the high mountain country of Northern Utah where he worked as a Range Conservationist for the Utah NRCS in the Coalville Field Office for 10 years. In addition to working in Utah, Thomas also worked for the Oklahoma and New Mexico NRCS as a Rangeland Management Specialist. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Rangeland Management and Wildlife Habitat Management at New Mexico State University. Thomas is a welcome addition to the group and we are glad he is here in Oregon!

Oregon’s Oak: A Vanishing Legacy & Caretakers in Time

Two short films produced by Yamhill Watershed Stewardship Fund and AH Creative.

Oregon white oak and the oak community are one of the most imperiled ecosystems in the entire United States. More than 95% of the oak habitat is gone, compared to 150 years ago, making it important to protect these trees now.

Once the dominant habitat tree in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, the Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana) was managed for food by generations of Native Americans. Oak habitat also provides food and habitat for approximately 250 native wildlife species.

Today the amount of space is for these majestic trees is greatly diminished, threatened by population growth, land conversion, and encroachment of other vegetation due to lack of fire management. The majority of oaks are in private ownership. These landowners hold the fate of Oregon’s tree in their hands.

These two short films were produced with the hope that more private landowners will recognize the significance of these mighty oaks so that this tree will continue to represent our state, our history and our heritage.

These films were produced with funding and participation from:   Yamhill Watershed Stewardship Fund, Yamhill County Cultural Coalition, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Friends of Trees, The Nature Conservancy, Yamhill Soil and Water Conservation District, Yamhill Small Woodlands Association, Greater Yamhill Watershed Council, Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, Heritage Seedlings, and private donors. Filmed on locations in Yamhill and Marion Counties, Oregon in the fall of 2015.

 

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