Welcome!

The Yamhill Soil and Water Conservation District (District) is led by a locally elected board of directors whose responsibility is to plan and oversee the delivery of services and programs that help conserve and protect water and soil resources, wildlife habitat, and other natural resources in Yamhill County.  The District is a unit of local government, and implements its programs and services in partnership with volunteers, non-profits, state and federal agencies, school districts and universities, watershed councils, landowners, and many others. 

2016 Annual Earth Day Celebration

A BIG shout-out to the wonderful partners that helped make Earth Day a smashing success including, Head Start of  Yamhill County; Chemeketa Americorps Volunteers; Linfield Student Volunteers; Greater Yamhill Watershed Council and Watershed Education Adventures, Karen Hoyt and her Birds of Prey, Tom Brewster and his bird box station, and many, many wonderful volunteers. 

This year's annual Earth Day Celebration gave adults and children alike the opportunity to explore and reconnect with nature through a variety of hands-on experiences. During Karen Hoyt's popular presentation, guests were captivated by an up close and personal view of birds of prey. For those brave enough to hold creepy crawlies, there were snakes and salamanders ready to say 'Hello!' Many guests purchased native plants and built bird boxes to take home as a reminder to continue celebrating our Earth every day.

Thank you to Charles Hillestad for taking these amazing photos

       

 

Check Out the Native Plants We Will Be Selling at Earth Day

In preparation of our annual Earth Day Celebration this Saturday, we are highlighting a Plant of the Day on our Miller Woods Facebook page. Each plant will be available for purchase onApril 16 from 10am – 2pm.

Today’s plant is Yarrow. It is a hardy perennial with fern-like leaves growing from 4 to 36 inches. The tiny white to pale pink blooms flower from mid-spring to mid-fall. Yarrow thrives in almost any situation and can become invasive. It can be used as a lawn substitute and can be mowed to form a soft carpet. It grows in full sun and slightly moist to dry soils. It is an excellent plant for butterflies and is deer resistant!

To see all the featured plants we will be selling, go to www.facebook.com/enjoymillerwoods

WELCOME Sonya: Volunteer joins district staff as Miller Woods Property Manager

Sonya is no stranger to the district as she has been a dedicated volunteer at Miller Woods since 2006. Recognized at the District’s 2014 Annual Dinner for her service, Sonya has contributed over 5000 volunteer hours.

Born and raised near Orlando, Florida Sonya has made Oregon her home since 2003.  She loves the mild weather, being surrounded by trees and seeing mountains in the distance.  An avid outdoor adventurer she enjoys running, cycling, hiking, cooking and reading.

She holds a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Florida. Her career includes working with runaway and homeless teens in California and later working in finance and office administration at OHSU in Portland.  

After her many years of dedicated service, she feels right at home as the Miller Woods Property Manager. Sonya can be reached by emailingyswcd.millerwoods@gmail.com or calling the district office at 503-472-6403.

Oregon’s Oak: A Vanishing Legacy & Caretakers in Time

Two short films produced by Yamhill Watershed Stewardship Fund and AH Creative.

Oregon white oak and the oak community are one of the most imperiled ecosystems in the entire United States. More than 95% of the oak habitat is gone, compared to 150 years ago, making it important to protect these trees now.

Once the dominant habitat tree in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, the Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana) was managed for food by generations of Native Americans. Oak habitat also provides food and habitat for approximately 250 native wildlife species.

Today the amount of space is for these majestic trees is greatly diminished, threatened by population growth, land conversion, and encroachment of other vegetation due to lack of fire management. The majority of oaks are in private ownership. These landowners hold the fate of Oregon’s tree in their hands.

These two short films were produced with the hope that more private landowners will recognize the significance of these mighty oaks so that this tree will continue to represent our state, our history and our heritage.

These films were produced with funding and participation from:   Yamhill Watershed Stewardship Fund, Yamhill County Cultural Coalition, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Friends of Trees, The Nature Conservancy, Yamhill Soil and Water Conservation District, Yamhill Small Woodlands Association, Greater Yamhill Watershed Council, Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, Heritage Seedlings, and private donors. Filmed on locations in Yamhill and Marion Counties, Oregon in the fall of 2015.